Frequently Asked Questions

 

  • What is the difference between physical and occupational therapy?
    Physical therapy works on a child’s gross motor skills. These skills include rolling, crawling, walking, running, jumping, and balance activities. Occupational therapy focuses on fine motor skills, handwriting, activities of daily living such as dressing and feeding, visual perception problems ands sensory processing disorders.
     
  • How will therapy help my child?
    Pediatric therapists take the activity the child has difficulties with and cut it down into small tasks to work on. They work on these tasks in a fun and playful manner; the children do not even know that they are “working”. As the child achieves these tasks the activities get more challenging until the child has achieved the skill. They are then ready to progress to the next developmental skill.
     
  • Is private therapy covered by my medical insurance?
    Yes, insurance will pay for physical and occupational therapy as long as it is medically necessary. We are out of network, so you may just have to pay a co-insurance for the services. We do all of the insurance billing for you and accept payment from the insurance company. We also deal with all of the procedures your insurance company has regarding authorizations for therapy and reimbursements.
     
  • How is school therapy different from private therapy?
    At school the therapists need to work on goals that are academic and measurable. If the child does not show significant delays they may not be eligible for services. Private therapy fills this gap and provides for services that are necessary for your child’s development. Private therapy is also available to you even if your child does receive therapy at school. Many times the frequency of therapy they receive at school is just not enough to see significant improvements in their functional skills. You may just want additional therapy to help your child progress along at a faster rate.
     
  • My pediatrician says to wait and see how my child develops. Should I wait?
    If you are concerned regarding your child’s developmental skills discuss it with the pediatrician and ask that he/she refers you for a physical or occupational therapy evaluation. Pediatric PT’s and OT’s are “experts” in child development. The research is clear, the earlier the therapy the greater the benefits.
     
  • How long will my child need therapy?
    Some children receive therapy just for a few months and others for a couple of years. You, the pediatrician and the therapist will discuss your child’s development and plan accordingly.
     
  • How long are treatment sessions?
    Initial evaluations are 1 hour. PT and OT sessions are usually 45 minutes. For young babies it may be 30 minutes and for a child with greater delays it may be 60 minutes. The length and frequency of therapy is determined on an individual basis and is discussed with the parent.
     
  • What type of payments do you accept?
    We accept cash, check and/or credit cards for your treatment, deductibles and co-pays.

 


ptotkids.com © 2011 • Privacy PolicyTerms Of Use

All Rights Reserved